Glowbugs. And why I will stop buying Computer Music Magazine.

So, inspired by getting a whole two comments in the last couple of weeks (on a blog that has lain mostly dormant for over two years), I decided to write a post.

About 3 years ago, when we were still living in Arizona, with still a year to go before we moved back here to Helsinki, I bought my daughter a little yellow ukulele. I would pick it up occasionally, finger random chords (too lazy to learn properly) and strum. After a few times of doing this, a piece of music began to emerge and when I played it, my kids would dance. It continued to evolve gradually over the next year or so, developing a relative minor section and a couple of little (I rather arrogantly thought) Beatles-esque baroque runs on the top string.

I continued playing it and my daughters continued dancing to it and enjoying it. I began to try to think of lyrics and a melody but found nothing that would match the music. I then decided that maybe the ukulele part could stand on its own two feet without vocals. Especially without my vocals.

So I made a tune out of it. I recorded the ukulele part into Garageband, then began layering other instruments on top. First some drums, then some electric guitar (heavily processed) and some synths. I then added a bass-line. Here is the result:

I picked the title ‘Glowbugs’, or ‘glowbugs’ as for some reason (over-weaning humility?) I don’t like to use capitals in my track names, because it suggests prettiness, childhood, dancing. Referring to my daughters whom this little tune originally entertained. I used Poolside’s cover of Neil Young’s Harvest Moon (a favourite of my wife’s and my daughters’) as a reference track, especially to set tempo and the drums.

The track (by which I mean my track, not Harvest Moon) to me sounds unfinished. There is little escalation through the 4:21 of the track, it basically just repeats itself, with only the major/relative minor contrast to leaven things. The drum track doesn’t even really have any fills.

But even if I spiced up the arrangement, there would still be lots of mistakes to fix. For example the bass has some timing mistakes and a lot of fret-rattle.

Then I could get onto a proper mix. This would involve me learning about mixing. I have a couple of books on recording and mixing and of course the web is full of advice. I am also a sucker for Computer Music and Total Music. The kinds of magazines that come with a DVD including 6GB of samples and some new effects plug-ins, then tutorials in the mag on mixing and mastering. I am pretty tech savvy (with a degree in electronics engineering that even involved taking some DSP courses), so I always think I could be a pretty good audio engineer if I set my mind to it.

So sometimes I sit down at my computer and think, OK, let’s start improving my mixing. I open up a track and then start going through the process. And then I get bored. Trying to optimise a track that already exists at some level bores the shit out of me. It feels too much like work. It is incredibly time-consuming and detail-oriented. Within 10 minutes of starting I am checking Facebook or surfing the web.

I like playing guitar and creating music. I don’t like cleaning up tracks and mixing.

So that’s why Glowbugs will remain as it is and why I will never again by Computer Music magazine.